Ingredients

  • allspice

    Allspice is a dried fruit and gets it's name from its flavour, which seems to be a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. The fruit is picked when green and ripped in the sun, when dried they are brown and look similar to a peppercorn, it is then ground for use in cooking.

  • almond butter/spread

    Almond butter may also be called almond spread. It is finely ground down almonds to a texture resembling a paste. In my cookbook I have a recipe for roasted almond butter, which has extra flavour due to the roasting and a little organic salt added. If purchasing a commercial almond butter in a jar, make sure it's 100% almonds.

  • almond extract (organic)

    Organic almond extract manufactured by ‘Frontier Natural Flavors’ has the best flavour, and price I've found. I purchase it online from iherb.

  • almond flakes

    Almond flakes are thinly sliced blanched almonds. They are also good to resemble oats in recipes.

  • almond meal/flour

    The most favoured gluten/grain free flour substitute in my kitchen is almond meal. It is finely ground blanched almonds and in some countries, it is called almond flour. It has a slightly sweet flavour so you don’t have to add as much sweetener when baking with it. All kinds of nuts can be ground down to make a meal and are excellent for raw cheesecake or pie bases. Nut and seeds meals/flours are all best stored in airtight containers in the fridge or freezer to prevent them going rancid.

  • almond milk

    A dairy free milk made from soaking almonds over night, rinsing well and blending with fresh water. Drained through a nut bag and all the liquid milk squeezed out. Recipe on page 297 of The JOYful Table cookbook, if purchasing a commercial brand, read label to avoid added sugars, gums, thickeners and preservatives.

  • almonds

    Almonds have 240mg of calcium in 50gms, as much as is found in 200ml of milk. Nuts are a great protein snack. Eat them raw or activated and it's best to avoid store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils. When ground finely almonds make a wonderful nut meal/flour for grain-free baking.

  • apple cider vinegar

    Apple Cider Vinegar is used extensively throughout my recipes due to its health benefits. When purchasing, look for raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar ‘with the mother’ it has a cloudy appearance. Avoid malt vinegars as they are made from barley and contain gluten.

  • apple(s)

    Apples can be eaten fresh, cooked or dried, they are low in kilojoules and are a good source of vitamin C, which makes them a good choice for a healthy snack. When using fresh sliced apple, the surface will go brown as oxygen from the air reacts with an enzyme in the apple flesh. This reaction can be stopped by cooking the apple or brushing with lemon juice, drying the apple slices will also kill the enzyme. Apples are high in fibre, including soluble fibre. Packed with numerous phytochemicals such as quercetin that is know to help prevent heart disease and cancer. Purchase organic if possible, apples should always be washed before eating, if they have been waxed it's best to peel them as it will prevent pesticide residues from being washed off.

  • arrowroot flour

    Arrowroot is a herb, the roots are cultivated for its starch properties. It is used in my recipes as a thickener and I also like combining it with almond meal to produce a much lighter texture, more like a gluten flour. I find the starch helps to bind the ingredients together. You can substitute tapioca flour, which is made from the dried roots of the cassava plant. Tapioca can be used in baking, it has a slightly sweet flavour. However, I do not recommend thickening with tapioca, as it has a stretchy, gummy texture. Supermarkets only sell in very small containers, which is not cost effective. Purchase from baking specialty stores, health food stores or online. ( When substituting for cornflour in recipes, 2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 tablespoon cornflour/starch).

    This item can be purchased here

  • avocado oil

    Avocado oil is excellent for dressings and dips, pan frying and barbecuing, baking and roasting. Recent research on the heating of oils, has revealed avocado oil is perfect for high temperature cooking. Choose cold pressed, extra virgin, avocado oil. My favourite brand is 'Grove'. Purchase in a dark bottle and do not refrigerate.

  • avocado(s)

    It is often mistaken for a vegetable, the avocado is a fruit. It has a rich buttery flavour and smooth texture. Avocados are a good source of healthy fats, vitamin C, E and B6, potassium and dietary fibre, also useful amounts of iron magnesium and folate.

  • bacon

    Choose grass fed bacon that's nitrate free, so you avoid the chemicals and additives.

  • baking powder (gluten free)

    Baking Powder is a rising agent for baked goods. If substituting for baking soda you will need 4 times the quantity. Ensure you purchase a gluten free, no aluminum brand. Alternatively, you can make your own baking powder; 1 teaspoon of baking powder is equal to 1⁄4 teaspoon of baking soda and 1⁄2 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Note, that they should only be combined when preparing your recipe.

  • baking soda (bicarb)

    Also known as Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium Bicarbonate and is used as a rising agent in baking, it contains no gluten or grains. I use Bob's Red Mill baking soda as I find it rises better than other brands I've tried.

  • balsamic vinegar

    Balsamic vinegar originated from Italy, it is made from a reduction of pressed grapes and used as a condiment. Organic balsamic vinegar mixed with olive oil works well over healthy salads. Avoid malt vinegars as they are made from barley and contain gluten.

  • banana(s)

    In a paleo diet it's best to eat bananas in moderation. They are excellent to use to naturally sweeten a recipe and then you can reduce or eliminate other sweeteners. Bananas are a very good source of vitamin B6, manganese, vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber potassium, copper, so you can see they are healthy but I find it's best just no in large qualities due to their high natural sugars.

  • basil leaves

    The culinary herb basil is of the mint family. The type used in Italian dishes is sweet basil opposed to Asian dishes which may use Thai basil, lemon or holy basil. I prefer to add at the end of a recipe or toss through as I serve a dish as cooking can destroy the flavour.

  • bean sprouts

    Bean sprouts also know as bean shoots are a common ingredient used in Asian cuisine. Bean shoots are grown from mung bean seeds, they add great flavour and texture to dishes. A great source of dietary fibre, vitamins C and K, protein, magnesium and rich in digestible energy.

  • beef broth/stock

    Home made beef broth is excellent for healing Leaky Gut and to drink when unwell. Traditionally broth was made just from meat bones and simmered for hours to remove the gelatin, marrow and goodness from them. These days vegetables are also added to give extra flavour. If purchasing store bought broth/stocks, read your labels as many companies have changed the name of MSG to yeast extract. Organic or free range brands are available. I keep one on hand for emergencies. I get the butcher to cut my beef bones up so it's easy for the marrow and nutrients to be released easily. I prefer to making my broth in a slow cooker. I keep ice block trays filled with broth in the freezer ready for when just a small amount is required in a recipe.

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