Beetroot Smoothie

Beetroot Smoothie

  • Serves: 1 lge or 2 sml
  • Prep Time: 00:05
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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This refreshing smoothie is packed full of so many nutrients. Beetroot has health promoting antioxidants and nutrients such as vitamin C, beta-carotene, betaine, folate, magnesium, copper, phosphorus, potassium and iron. I created this smoothie after researching the benefits beetroot has on our heart health and lowering high blood pressure. Check out my blog 'You Can't Beat Beetroot' for more insight into this superfood.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1/2 or 1 small raw beetroot, peeled & roughly chopped
  • 2 Lge celery stick(s), roughly chopped
  • 1 med apple(s), core removed and roughly chopped
  • 2 Tbsp almonds
  • 1 Tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 1 Tbsp pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1 Tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • Pinch of sea salt
  • 300ml chilled coconut water (unsweetened), or filtered water
  • 1 cup ice cubes, (optional)

Directions

Add all of the above ingredients in order, to a high-speed blender.

Blend at half-speed for a few seconds to break up the vegetables, increase to maxium-speed until you reach a smooth consistency or to your liking.

Pour into a glass and enjoy!

(Optional, I like to change it up a bit by adding a small piece of fresh ginger)

beetroot

This common root vegetable is a Superfood. Beetroot are packed with health promoting antioxidants and nutrients such as vitamin C, beta-carotene, betaine, folate, magnesium, copper, phosphorus and iron. Beetroot belongs to the same family as spinach and swiss chard, both the leaves and root can be eaten. It's history stretches back to 4,000 years ago and has long been used for medicinal purposes, primarily for blood, liver and digestive disorders. Recent research and trials have shown the benefits of beetroot juice in lowering high blood pressure. Check out my blog on the Health Benefits of Beetroot and best ways to store the leaves and root.

celery stick(s)

Both celery stalks and leaves can be used, whole stalks are eaten raw in salads or cooked to give flavour in stews and soups. Raw stalks with the leaves are excellent in your morning smoothie and give you a good dose of vitamin K, B and A, folate, riboflavin and more, plus celery contains several minerals.

apple(s)

Apples can be eaten fresh, cooked or dried, they are low in kilojoules and are a good source of vitamin C, which makes them a good choice for a healthy snack. When using fresh sliced apple, the surface will go brown as oxygen from the air reacts with an enzyme in the apple flesh. This reaction can be stopped by cooking the apple or brushing with lemon juice, drying the apple slices will also kill the enzyme. Apples are high in fibre, including soluble fibre. Packed with numerous phytochemicals such as quercetin that is know to help prevent heart disease and cancer. Purchase organic if possible, apples should always be washed before eating, if they have been waxed it's best to peel them as it will prevent pesticide residues from being washed off.

almonds

Almonds have 240mg of calcium in 50gms, as much as is found in 200ml of milk. Nuts are a great protein snack. Eat them raw or activated and it's best to avoid store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils. When ground finely almonds make a wonderful nut meal/flour for grain-free baking.

sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds have a mild nutty flavour. An excellent snack as they are high in protein, delicious added to smoothies and grain free baking. Sunflower seeds can be finely ground to replace almond and other nut meals/flours in baked goods, substitute ratio 1:1. They are high in Vitamin E. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals. Sunflower seeds are also a good source of magnesium, which can help calm your nerves, muscles and blood vessels.

pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

Pumpkin seeds or pepitas are an amazing health food, a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds contains nearly half of the recommended daily amount of magnesium. They are small packages full of nutrition (plant based omega 3 fats, zinc, anti-inflammatory benefits). Sprinkle over salads, add to snack bars, granola, smoothies and they can also be ground down to add to grain free baked goods.

chia seeds

These little seeds absorb 9-12 times their weight in water and are excellent to add as a thickener to sauces and fruit spreads. They can also be use as an egg replacement in muffins and cakes (1 tablespoon chia seeds mixed with 3 tablespoons of water). There are many health benefits of chia. It is the richest plant source of Omega 3 fats, dietary fibre and protein. Chia seeds are also packed with a variety of vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, amino acids and fatty acids.

cinnamon

I am sure you will notice as you read my recipes that cinnamon appears quite frequently. It lends itself to savoury and sweet dishes. I have used ground cinnamon in my recipes if not stated otherwise. The best cinnamon to use is Ceylon (Verum). It has huge health benefits in regulating blood sugar levels. Cinnamon has antifungal properties and candida (yeast overgrowth) cannot live in a cinnamon environment. Added to food it inhibits bacterial growth, making it a natural food preservative and these are just a few of the benefits.

sea salt

Organic unbleached, unrefined organic Celtic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt is my salt of choice as these contain healthy minerals and trace elements that our body needs. Regular table salt has been bleached, refined and processed leaving minimal health benefits. If you choose to use regular table salt in my recipes you will need to reduce the quantity or the end result will be to salty.

coconut water (unsweetened)

This is the liquid found inside young coconuts. It is packed with electrolytes, excellent for after exercise. Coconut water contains potassium, calcium and magnesium and is also a natural hydrator. I use it in my smoothies and have added it to a few of my recipes. You can find it in health food stores and supermarkets. Ensure you read the label carefully as some contain preservatives and/or sugar and may not be 100% coconut water.

ice cubes

Use filtered water to make your ice.

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