Hot Cross Buns (nut-free)

Hot Cross Buns (nut-free)

  • Serves: 12
  • Prep Time: 00:25
  • Cooking Time: 00:35
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A delicious nut-free version of Hot Cross Buns. These traditional Easter Buns have a more bread-like texture than regular gluten-free muffin style Hot Cross Buns. Spiced with cinnamon and allspice and glazed to add a beautiful shine to their tops. Perfect for school lunch boxes.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1 cup arrowroot flour, or tapioca
  • 1 cup golden flaxseed (fine ground)
  • 1 Tbsp psyllium husk powder
  • 4 Medjool date(s), pitted
  • 2 Tbsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp allspice
  • 2 tsp baking powder (gluten free)
  • 1 tsp baking soda (bicarb)
  • 1/2 tsp pink Himalayan salt, or sea salt
  • 1 Tbsp fine orange zest
  • 1 Tbsp orange juice (fresh squeezed)
  • 3 lge egg(s)
  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 3 Tbsp honey (unprocessed)
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (organic)
  • 3/4 cup filtered water
  • 1/2 cup sultanas (organic)
  • CROSSES:
  • 3 Tbsp arrowroot flour, or tapioca
  • 2 tsp coconut flour
  • 1 3/4 Tbsp filtered water
  • GLAZE (optional):
  • 1 Tbsp honey (unprocessed)
  • 1 Tbsp filtered water
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

Directions

Preheat oven to 180c (fan-forced). Line or grease a 12 cup muffin tray (or use a good quality silicone muffin tray).

Add the arrowroot, golden flaxseed, psyllium powder, dates, cinnamon, allspice, baking powder, soda and salt to a food processor. Process for 10 seconds to produce a finer texture and break down the dates.

Have all the wet ingredients and sultanas measured before the next step. The wet ingredients need to be added and mixed without delay, to prevent all the moisture being absorbed by the flaxseed before the fruit can be stirred through.

Add the orange zest, juice, eggs, coconut oil, honey, vanilla and water. Process to mix well and produce a smooth mixture, approximately 10 seconds. Scrape down sides of bowl and remove blade. Stir through the sultanas (the mixture becomes quite elastic, I find it easier to use a spatula to push the fruit through the mixture).

Spoon the mixture evenly between the 12 muffin cups, then use the spoon to press into the mixture to help it spread to the sides of the cups.

Bake for 25 minutes (tops will be crunchy), then remove to pipe the crosses on and place back without delay to finish cooking for a further 10 minutes (notes for crosses below). You want to prevent the buns from sinking before being fully cooked. (You can pipe the crosses on before baking if you prefer, I found these buns rise so well that the crosses split). Once cooked, allow the buns to cool in the tray for 15 minutes (if you used paper liners, remove and place on a wire cooling rack). Spread a sheet of paper under the rack to catch drips when glazing. Use a pastry brush to coat the top of each bun with the glaze mixture.

FOR THE CROSSES: You need to make a thick paste. Add the arrowroot and coconut flours to a cup or small bowl and mix. Add 1 tablespoon of water, mix well, then add the remaining water 1 teaspoon at a time. If you need more water just add 1 drop at a time, it can go from a thick paste to a runny mess very quickly. Spoon into a piping bag or use a snap lock bag and snip a little hole in the corner. Pipe a cross on top of each bun.

TO MAKE THE GLAZE: Heat the honey, water and cinnamon together and mix well.

Serve warm or at room temperature, also delicious sliced and toasted. Suitable to freeze.

arrowroot flour

Arrowroot is a herb, the roots are cultivated for its starch properties. It is used in my recipes as a thickener and I also like combining it with almond meal to produce a much lighter texture, more like a gluten flour. I find the starch helps to bind the ingredients together. You can substitute tapioca flour, which is made from the dried roots of the cassava plant. Tapioca can be used in baking, it has a slightly sweet flavour. However, I do not recommend thickening with tapioca, as it has a stretchy, gummy texture. Supermarkets only sell in very small containers, which is not cost effective. Purchase from baking specialty stores, health food stores or online. ( When substituting for cornflour in recipes, 2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 tablespoon cornflour/starch).

golden flaxseed (fine ground)

Golden flaxseed meal is ground linseed. You will find it in many of my recipes. It is also a great egg substitute when mixed with water. Flaxseed is very low in carbohydrates, making it ideal for people who limit their intake of carbs. It is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, which is the key force against inflammation in our bodies. Flaxseed must be stored in the fridge. I like to use golden flaxseed as it is lighter in colour, than the brown variety and produces a nicer colour to your baking.

psyllium husk powder

Psyllium powder is ground down psyllium husks to produce a very fine powder. Psyllium is a source of soluble dietary fibre, it expands when mixed with liquid. It can help relieve constipation and diarrhea. Psyllium is used in gluten free baking, as the finely ground husks bind moisture and help make breads rise and less crumbly. You can purchase psyllium husk powder from a supermarket or make your own by using a blender or food processor to ground to a very fine powder.

Medjool date(s)

I use Medjool dates in my recipes, I like the flavour and softness of these dates. A bonus, there are no preservatives used with these dates. They blend easy when adding to recipes and give a slight caramel flavour.

Medjool dates are an excellent source of dietary fiber, rich in potassium, copper, manganese, magnesium and vitamin B6.

cinnamon

I am sure you will notice as you read my recipes that cinnamon appears quite frequently. It lends itself to savoury and sweet dishes. I have used ground cinnamon in my recipes if not stated otherwise. The best cinnamon to use is Ceylon (Verum). It has huge health benefits in regulating blood sugar levels. Cinnamon has antifungal properties and candida (yeast overgrowth) cannot live in a cinnamon environment. Added to food it inhibits bacterial growth, making it a natural food preservative and these are just a few of the benefits.

allspice

Allspice is a dried fruit and gets it's name from its flavour, which seems to be a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. The fruit is picked when green and ripped in the sun, when dried they are brown and look similar to a peppercorn, it is then ground for use in cooking.

baking powder (gluten free)

Baking Powder is a rising agent for baked goods. If substituting for baking soda you will need 4 times the quantity. Ensure you purchase a gluten free, no aluminum brand. Alternatively, you can make your own baking powder; 1 teaspoon of baking powder is equal to 1⁄4 teaspoon of baking soda and 1⁄2 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Note, that they should only be combined when preparing your recipe.

baking soda (bicarb)

Also known as Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium Bicarbonate and is used as a rising agent in baking, it contains no gluten or grains. I use Bob's Red Mill baking soda as I find it rises better than other brands I've tried.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

orange zest

The orange is a fruit from the citrus family. Orange zest is the finely grated skin from the outside of the orange but doesn't include the white pith which is bitter. The skin contains the orange oil which gives a stronger flavour when added to cooking. Use organic and locally grown if possible, scrub orange skin before using.

orange juice (fresh squeezed)

The orange is a fruit from the citrus family. Use freshly squeezed juice from the ripe fruit. The most common orange varieties are - Valencia, Navel and Blood oranges. Fresh orange juice is high in vitamin C, phytochemicals and flavonoids.

egg(s)

I have used large free range or organic eggs from a 700g carton in my recipes. Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids, also studies have shown that lutein (yellow colour) in egg yolks protects against the progress of early heart disease.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

vanilla extract (organic)

Use an organic vanilla extract (not an essence) or vanilla powder. Vanilla makes a big difference to the flavour of a recipe, I recommend keeping to the quantities I have stated in a recipe. I prefer Madagascar pure vanilla extract manufactured by ‘Simply Organic’ and for powder, Vanillamax 100% pure, finely ground Madagascar vanilla beans produced by Bulletproof.

filtered water

I feel it's much better for our health if we filter our water. Our tap water contains disinfectants, chlorine and chloramine. Also floride is add which I believe is toxin to our bodies.

sultanas (organic)

The sultana is a pale green oval seedless grape which has been dried. Sultanas are sweet and used in baking and eaten as a snack. Purchase naturally dried, preservative and oil free sultanas, organic is best.

arrowroot flour

Arrowroot is a herb, the roots are cultivated for its starch properties. It is used in my recipes as a thickener and I also like combining it with almond meal to produce a much lighter texture, more like a gluten flour. I find the starch helps to bind the ingredients together. You can substitute tapioca flour, which is made from the dried roots of the cassava plant. Tapioca can be used in baking, it has a slightly sweet flavour. However, I do not recommend thickening with tapioca, as it has a stretchy, gummy texture. Supermarkets only sell in very small containers, which is not cost effective. Purchase from baking specialty stores, health food stores or online. ( When substituting for cornflour in recipes, 2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 tablespoon cornflour/starch).

coconut flour

This flour is made by drying and grinding the meat of a coconut to a fine texture. Coconut flour is an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. It's a good grain-free alternative but does require a larger amount of liquid than normal when baking. When replacing in a recipe that calls for wheat flour, use this guide; 1 cup of wheat flour = 1/3 cup coconut flour, add an extra egg and an extra 1/3 cup of liquid. There are now quite a few brands of coconut flour available and they all seem to perform differently depending on how coarse the texture is. In my recipes I have used Organic Coconut Flour from 'Let's Do Organic', I like its finer texture (I purchase from iherb.com).

filtered water

I feel it's much better for our health if we filter our water. Our tap water contains disinfectants, chlorine and chloramine. Also floride is add which I believe is toxin to our bodies.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

filtered water

I feel it's much better for our health if we filter our water. Our tap water contains disinfectants, chlorine and chloramine. Also floride is add which I believe is toxin to our bodies.

cinnamon

I am sure you will notice as you read my recipes that cinnamon appears quite frequently. It lends itself to savoury and sweet dishes. I have used ground cinnamon in my recipes if not stated otherwise. The best cinnamon to use is Ceylon (Verum). It has huge health benefits in regulating blood sugar levels. Cinnamon has antifungal properties and candida (yeast overgrowth) cannot live in a cinnamon environment. Added to food it inhibits bacterial growth, making it a natural food preservative and these are just a few of the benefits.

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