Asian Meatball Salad

Asian Meatball Salad

  • Serves: 4 (20 small balls)
  • Prep Time: 00:25
  • Cooking Time: 00:20
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These tasty Asian Meatballs are so simple and quick to make. While the meatballs cook in the oven, prepare the Coleslaw salad and Asian dressing. Put them all together and you have a very nourishing meal that's perfect for lunch or dinner.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • MEATBALLS:
  • 2 spring onion(s), finely sliced with green tops
  • 2 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 tsp ginger, minced or finely grated
  • 1 tsp garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper, ground
  • 500g turkey mince, (chicken or pork mince can be used)
  • 2 Tbsp coconut flour
  • DRESSING:
  • 2 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp ginger, minced or finely grated
  • 1/2 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • SALAD:
  • 1/2 savoy cabbage, finely shredded
  • 1/4 red cabbage, finely shredded
  • 1 Lge carrot(s), grated
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped coriander, leaves

Directions

Preheat oven to 190c. Line a large baking tray with baking paper.

Add spring onions, coconut aminos, sesame oil, ginger, garlic, salt and pepper to a large bowl and mix.

Add turkey (or your choice of meat) and coconut flour, mix well (I prefer to use my hands to combine the mixture well). Let sit for 5 minutes to allow the coconut flour to absorb some moisture.

Scoop out heaped tablespoons of mixture to form 20 small balls and place onto the prepared tray (I use a small ice cream scoop to form a nice shaped meatball).

Bake for 20 minutes or until completely cooked through. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

To make the Dressing: Add all the dressing ingredients to a small bowl and whisk well to combine. Set aside.

To prepare the Salad: Add all the salad ingredients to a large bowl, mix well. Pour 2/3 of the dressing over the salad and toss to coat well.

To Serve: Divide the salad between four individual bowls and top with the meatballs. Pour the remaining dressing over the meatballs and sprinkle with a little extra mint and coriander.

spring onion(s)

Other names for spring onion are scallion or green onion. They have hollow green leaves and a small root bulb and can be eaten raw or cooked. The green tops are also used sliced or chopped as a garnish. The green tops are a good source of vitamin C and beta carotene.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.

sesame oil

Sesame seed oil adds extra flavour to Asian cooking. Purchase sesame oil that contains no MSG and no preservatives. Store in the fridge once opened. Sesame seed oil can help heart health and is good for the skin both topically and internally. It contains anti-cancer compounds, including phytic acid, magnesium and phytosterols.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

garlic

Garlic is a close relative to the onion and has been used throughout history for both medicinal and culinary purposes. In most of my recipes I use minced garlic as I find it distributes better throughout the dish. When in a hurry I use organic minced garlic which I purchase in glass jars and store in the fridge. When garlic powder is needed for a particular recipe, I use 'Simply Organic' brand. Why is garlic so good for us? It is an immune booster, antibiotic, good for the heart, cancer fighter and it's also knew as a weight loss aid (appetite suppressant).

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

black pepper, ground

Black and white pepper both come from the fruit of a tropical vine. Black pepper is the cooked and dried unripe fruit, know as a peppercorn and white pepper is from the ripe fruit seed. Pepper is usually coupled with salt, sprinkled over or added to food.

turkey mince

Boneless turkey that's been ground down. Turkey can be used in place of chicken mince in dishes. Choose grass fed, free range turkey mince. Turkey is a rich source of protein, it also contains iron, zinc, potassium, phosphorus, vitamin B6 and niacin.

coconut flour

This flour is made by drying and grinding the meat of a coconut to a fine texture. Coconut flour is an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. It's a good grain-free alternative but does require a larger amount of liquid than normal when baking. When replacing in a recipe that calls for wheat flour, use this guide; 1 cup of wheat flour = 1/3 cup coconut flour, add an extra egg and an extra 1/3 cup of liquid. There are now quite a few brands of coconut flour available and they all seem to perform differently depending on how coarse the texture is. In my recipes I have used Organic Coconut Flour from 'Let's Do Organic', I like its finer texture (I purchase from iherb.com).

sesame oil

Sesame seed oil adds extra flavour to Asian cooking. Purchase sesame oil that contains no MSG and no preservatives. Store in the fridge once opened. Sesame seed oil can help heart health and is good for the skin both topically and internally. It contains anti-cancer compounds, including phytic acid, magnesium and phytosterols.

olive oil

The olive fruit of the olive tree is pressed and crushed to released the oil. Healthy fats like olive oil are essential for brain function and to transport vitamins and minerals throughout our bodies. This is a delicious oil to drizzled over salads and vegetables.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.

lemon juice

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice. Most store bought lemon juice containers preservatives.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

savoy cabbage

Savoy cabbage has ruffled green outer leaves and is higher in beta carotene than other varieties. Savoy cabbage has less water content than regular green cabbage which makes it a much better choice to use in a coleslaw. Using it will help prevent the watering down of your dressing.

red cabbage

There are many different kinds of cabbage. Red cabbage also known as purple cabbage is similar to the green varieties but it is much higher in vitamin C, vitamin A and twice as much iron as green cabbage. It's high in fibre and a good source of potassium, the red colour is a bonus, it can help you with achieving your rainbow of daily vegetables (when cooked it turns more blue, adding a little vinegar will help keep it's deeper red colour).

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

mint leaves

Peppermint is one of the easiest and hardest herbs to grown. Studies have uncovered a variety of health benefits. Mint leave oil is used as a digestive aid, to relieve pain, it has anticancer properties and can help with allergies.

coriander

Coriander is also know as cilantro. The fresh chopped green leaves in large amounts are a good source of vitamin C. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian, Thai, and Mexican dishes. They are usually tossed through just before serving as the heat can diminish the flavour. The dried fruits are known as coriander seeds, the seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed. The word coriander in food preparation may only be referring to the ground seeds not the plant.

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