Tuna Salad

Tuna Salad

  • Serves: 3 - 4
  • Prep Time: 00:15
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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Tuna salad is a perfect recipe for a quick, low fuss lunch. I keep extra hard-boiled eggs on hand in the fridge, this makes it even faster to prepare. Adding sauerkraut to this salad will also help with good gut health.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 425g can tuna (wild caught), drained
  • 1 lge lebanese cucumber(s), diced
  • 1 carrot(s), grated
  • 2 - 3 cups green cabbage, finely shredded (you can also add red cabbage)
  • 1 celery stick(s), diced
  • 1/2 cup sauerkraut, optional
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise, (homemade egg mayonnaise preferred)
  • 3 hard-boiled egg(s)
  • 1 lge avocado(s), diced
  • 1/4 tsp pink Himalayan salt, and ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 - 4 lge iceberg lettuce, leaves to serve

Directions

To a large bowl add, tuna, cucumber, carrot, cabbage, celery, sauerkraut and mayonnaise.

Mix to combine well, distributing the ingredients evenly throughout.

Gently stir through, chopped eggs, avocado and seasoning.

To serve, place a lettuce leave on each plate and divide tuna salad evenly into the leaves.

You may like to decorate with extra egg wedges and sprouts.

tuna (wild caught)

Tuna is a saltwater finfish, choose wild caught tuna not farmed. When purchasing canned tuna, select pole and line caught, in brine or spring water (this will prevent the tuna being stored in unhealthy oils), also choose in a BPA free can. Read your labels and look at the origin. Tuna is a good source of omega 3 fatty acids, protein and vitamin D.

lebanese cucumber(s)

Lebanese cucumbers are usually just a little smaller and have thinner skins than the regular green cucumber and are eaten with skin on, which means more green into your diet. They also don't seem to cause burping or indigestion. Cucumbers contain Vitamin K.

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

green cabbage

There are many different kinds of cabbage, green is the most common cabbage, it has a mild flavour that can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Cabbage is very high in fibre and very low in kilojoules, it contains twice as much folate as the red variety and a source of vitamin C.

celery stick(s)

Both celery stalks and leaves can be used, whole stalks are eaten raw in salads or cooked to give flavour in stews and soups. Raw stalks with the leaves are excellent in your morning smoothie and give you a good dose of vitamin K, B and A, folate, riboflavin and more, plus celery contains several minerals.

sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is fermented finely cut cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria. It has a long shelf life and a sour flavour, both result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage (a process of pickling). There are many health benefits claimed for sauerkraut. it is a source of vitamins C, B and K, it is also high in calcium, magnesium and fibre. The fermentation process increases the bioavailability of nutrients. The unpasteurized and uncooked, sauerkraut also contains live lactobacilli and beneficial microbes and is rich in enzymes. The probiotics that sauerkraut contains, improves digestion and promotes the growth of healthy gut flora, protecting against many diseases of the digestive tract.

mayonnaise

A basic egg mayonnaise can be used as a base to make sauces and dressing. Use a mild flavoured healthy oil when making mayonnaise. My Egg Mayonnaise recipe can be found here or on page 207 of 'The JOYful Table' cookbook.

egg(s)

I have used large free range or organic eggs from a 700g carton in my recipes. Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids, also studies have shown that lutein (yellow colour) in egg yolks protects against the progress of early heart disease.

avocado(s)

It is often mistaken for a vegetable, the avocado is a fruit. It has a rich buttery flavour and smooth texture. Avocados are a good source of healthy fats, vitamin C, E and B6, potassium and dietary fibre, also useful amounts of iron magnesium and folate.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

iceberg lettuce

There are many varieties of lettuce but iceberg has large rounder leaves, which makes them perfect as a cup to hold or wrap other foods in. Lettuce is most often used for salads, sandwiches and for wraps (in the place of grain and high carb wraps). Lettuce is a rich source of vitamin K and A, it is a moderate source of folate and iron. Purchase organic where possible, as they are sprayed with herbicides. Wash well as lettuce and be contaminated with bacteria.

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