Pineapple Coconut Cake with Lemon Icing

Pineapple Coconut Cake with Lemon Icing

  • Serves: 15 squares
  • Prep Time: 00:20
  • Cooking Time: 00:35
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A deliciously moist cake that's so versatile. It can be made into a no fuss slab cake drizzled with lemon icing, or into a double layered Birthday Cake or cupcakes. This yummy cake is just as delicious made into my nut-free version (see notes for converting below). Click the arrow on my photo to scroll through to check out how this recipe looks as a Birthday Cake. You can halve the recipe if a smaller cake is required.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 300g fresh pineapple, or 1 x 425g can unsweetened pineapple drained
  • 1/2 cup honey (unprocessed)
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, soft
  • 1/2 cup coconut (organic desiccated)
  • 4 Lge egg(s)
  • 2 cups almond meal/flour
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda (bicarb)
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp fine pink Himalayan salt, or sea salt
  • LEMON ICING:
  • 1/2 cup coconut cream
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 1 Tbsp honey (unprocessed)
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp fine lemon zest
  • 1 1/2 tsp arrowroot flour
  • To decorate: 1/3 cup toasted almond flakes
  • NUT-FREE VERSION:
  • 2 cups finely ground sunflower and pumpkin seeds (equal portions) , to replace the almond meal
  • 3 1/2 tsp baking powder (gluten free), to replace the baking soda

Directions

Preheat oven to 160c. Line the base and sides of a large 32 x 22cm rectangle baking tin with baking paper (or the base of 2 x 20cm springform cake tins and grease sides with coconut oil).

Add pineapple flesh to a food processor and process to form a puree. Scrape down lid and sides of bowl.

Add honey, coconut oil, coconut and eggs. Process for approximately 6 - 8 seconds to mix well, scrape down sides of bowl.

Add almond meal, coconut flour, baking soda, ginger and salt. Process for 12 seconds.

Transfer to prepared tin, spread the batter evenly over the base and smooth the top. (If you are making a double layered cake - divide the batter evenly between the 2 tins).

Bake for 35 minutes, turning once during cooking for even colour. Cake is cooked when lightly brown on top and firm to the touch. Allow to cool in the tin, once cool turn out gently onto a serving plate. (For double layered cake: the flat bottoms will go together so the cakes can be sandwiched together with the filling. Go to Toppings & Spreads section for Cashew Whipped Cream to fill and frost your Birthday Cake).

To make the LEMON ICING: Add all the icing ingredients to a small saucepan. Whisk continually while heating over med - low heat. The icing will start to thicken just as it reaches boiling point, after the first one or two bubbles appear remove from the heat. Continue whisking briskly for 1 - 2 minutes off the heat (milk and oil should have emulsified together). Set aside to slightly cool (don't place in the fridge, it should be still warm when pouring), whisk again before icing the cake.

Spoon lemon icing over the cooled slab cake (if needed use the back of a spoon to spread evenly) and decorate with toasted almond flakes, or toasted coconut flakes for nut-free. Place in the fridge to firm up the icing, then cut into serving sizes.

pineapple

Pineapple is a tropical fruit. The pineapple flesh can be eaten fresh, cooked, dried, juiced or preserved. Pineapple is an excellent source of manganese and vitamin C, it also contains Bromelain. Bromelain serves many purposes but is best know as a digestive enzyme, it breakdowns proteins in food to provide amino acids.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

coconut (organic desiccated)

In the majority of my recipes where I use dried coconut, I use finely-shredded desiccated coconut (unless I have stated otherwise). Make sure you are purchasing unsweetened and organic - many regular brands contain preservatives (sulphur dioxide).

egg(s)

I have used large free range or organic eggs from a 70g carton in my recipes. Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids, also studies have shown that lutein (yellow colour) in egg yolks protects against the progress of early heart disease.

almond meal/flour

The most favoured gluten/grain free flour substitute in my kitchen is almond meal. It is finely ground blanched almonds and in some countries, it is called almond flour. It has a slightly sweet flavour so you don’t have to add as much sweetener when baking with it. All kinds of nuts can be ground down to make a meal and are excellent for raw cheesecake or pie bases. Nut and seeds meals/flours are all best stored in airtight containers in the fridge or freezer to prevent them going rancid.

coconut flour

This flour is made by drying and grinding the meat of a coconut to a fine texture. Coconut flour is an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. It's a good grain-free alternative but does require a larger amount of liquid than normal when baking. When replacing in a recipe that calls for wheat flour, use this guide; 1 cup of wheat flour = 1/3 cup coconut flour, add an extra egg and an extra 1/3 cup of liquid. There are now quite a few brands of coconut flour available and they all seem to perform differently depending on how coarse the texture is. In my recipes I have used Organic Coconut Flour from 'Let's Do Organic', I like its finer texture (I purchase from iherb.com).

baking soda (bicarb)

Also known as Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium Bicarbonate and is used as a rising agent in baking, it contains no gluten or grains. I use Bob's Red Mill baking soda as I find it rises better than other brands I've tried.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

coconut cream

I use this extensively throughout my recipes; from soups to dinners to desserts and cakes. I think it is the best dairy-free alternative. It gives so much flavour and creaminess to a wide variety of dishes. When purchasing in the can read your labels, even some organic brands contain gums and thickeners, choose full-fat not low-fat versions. I use Honest To Goodness organic cream 400ml and Ayam which isn't organic but has no additives or thickeners and is much creamier and thicker than other brands (that's why I love it), it comes in 400ml, 270ml and 140ml size cans.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

lemon juice

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice. Most store bought lemon juice containers preservatives.

lemon zest

Lemon zest is the finely grated yellow skin of the citrus fruit lemon. The lemon skin is where you will find the oil. To make lemon zest, use a fine zest grater so you can avoid the bitter white pith under the skin.

arrowroot flour

Arrowroot is a herb, the roots are cultivated for its starch properties. It is used in my recipes as a thickener and I also like combining it with almond meal to produce a much lighter texture, more like a gluten flour. I find the starch helps to bind the ingredients together. You can substitute tapioca flour, which is made from the dried roots of the cassava plant. Tapioca can be used in baking, it has a slightly sweet flavour. However, I do not recommend thickening with tapioca, as it has a stretchy, gummy texture. Supermarkets only sell in very small containers, which is not cost effective. Purchase from baking specialty stores, health food stores or online. ( When substituting for cornflour in recipes, 2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 tablespoon cornflour/starch).

almond flakes

Almond flakes are thinly sliced blanched almonds. They are also good to resemble oats in recipes.

baking powder (gluten free)

Baking Powder is a rising agent for baked goods. If substituting for baking soda you will need 4 times the quantity. Ensure you purchase a gluten free, no aluminum brand. Alternatively, you can make your own baking powder; 1 teaspoon of baking powder is equal to 1⁄4 teaspoon of baking soda and 1⁄2 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Note, that they should only be combined when preparing your recipe.

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