Asian Coleslaw

Asian Coleslaw

  • Serves: 8
  • Prep Time: 00:20
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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An Asian touch to an old favourite salad. Perfect for BBQs and summer picnics. Using savoy cabbage will help prevent the dressing from watering down, as it doesn't contain as much liquid as other varieties. The addition of fresh green runner beans gives a nice crunch to the salad and a good dose of chlorophyll.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1/2 savoy cabbage, shredded finely
  • 1/4 red cabbage, shredded finely
  • 2 - 3 spring onion(s), finely sliced with some green tops
  • 1 lge carrot(s), thin julienne or coarsley grated
  • 150g green runner beans, thinly sliced diagonally
  • 1 cup mint leaves, firmly packed, torn or roughly chopped
  • 1 cup coriander, leaves roughly chopped
  • 1 red chilli, seeds removed and finely chopped (optional)
  • 2 Tbsp sesame seeds
  • DRESSING:
  • 3 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 Tbsp avocado oil, or olive oil
  • 3 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice, or lime
  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • 2 tsp maple syrup, 100%, or honey
  • 1 tsp ginger, minced or finely grated
  • 1/3 tsp pink Himalayan salt

Directions

To make the dressing: Whisk together all the dressing ingredients and set aside in the fridge.

Add the savoy and red cabbage, spring onions, carrot and finely sliced green beans that have been cut on the angle, to a large bowl. Mix well.

Stir in the mint, coriander, chilli and sesame seeds.

Just before serving, pour over the dressing and stir through.

Transfer to a serving dish or large salad bowl and top with a little thinly sliced chilli and spring onion greens tops.

savoy cabbage

Savoy cabbage has ruffled green outer leaves and is higher in beta carotene than other varieties. Savoy cabbage has less water content than regular green cabbage which makes it a much better choice to use in a coleslaw. Using it will help prevent the watering down of your dressing.

red cabbage

There are many different kinds of cabbage. Red cabbage also known as purple cabbage is similar to the green varieties but it is much higher in vitamin C, vitamin A and twice as much iron as green cabbage. It's high in fibre and a good source of potassium, the red colour is a bonus, it can help you with achieving your rainbow of daily vegetables (when cooked it turns more blue, adding a little vinegar will help keep it's deeper red colour).

spring onion(s)

Other names for spring onion are scallion or green onion. They have hollow green leaves and a small root bulb and can be eaten raw or cooked. The green tops are also used sliced or chopped as a garnish. The green tops are a good source of vitamin C and beta carotene.

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

green runner beans

Green runner beans are also know as string beans or green beans. This variety of green beans are mostly plant matter (the pod), with only tiny, immature seeds. They are eaten all around the world and can be purchased fresh, frozen or canned. The fibre content in green beans is very high and because of their rich green colour they provide us with chlorophyll. They are a good source of vitamin K and manganese.

mint leaves

Peppermint is one of the easiest and hardest herbs to grown. Studies have uncovered a variety of health benefits. Mint leave oil is used as a digestive aid, to relieve pain, it has anticancer properties and can help with allergies.

coriander

Coriander is also know as cilantro. The fresh chopped green leaves in large amounts are a good source of vitamin C. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian, Thai, and Mexican dishes. They are usually tossed through just before serving as the heat can diminish the flavour. The dried fruits are known as coriander seeds, the seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed. The word coriander in food preparation may only be referring to the ground seeds not the plant.

chilli

Chilli is the spicy fruit of plants that belong to the capsicum family. It is eaten fresh or dried. Chilli powder is dried and ground red chilli peppers. They are members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. Red chillies contain large amounts of vitamin C and are a good source of most B vitamins, they are also very high in potassium, magnesium and iron.

sesame seeds

Sesame seeds are found in the pod of the flowering sesame plant. Sesame seeds have a rich, nutty flavour and have one of the highest oil contents of any seed. They provide high amounts of protein and dietary fibre. Sesame seeds are also rich in B vitamins and minerals, manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron and zinc.

sesame oil

Sesame seed oil adds extra flavour to Asian cooking. Purchase sesame oil that contains no MSG and no preservatives. Store in the fridge once opened. Sesame seed oil can help heart health and is good for the skin both topically and internally. It contains anti-cancer compounds, including phytic acid, magnesium and phytosterols.

avocado oil

Avocado oil is excellent for dressings and dips, pan frying and barbecuing, baking and roasting. Recent research on the heating of oils, has revealed avocado oil is perfect for high temperature cooking. Choose cold pressed, extra virgin, avocado oil. My favourite brand is 'Grove'. Purchase in a dark bottle and do not refrigerate.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.

lemon juice

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice. Most store bought lemon juice containers preservatives.

fish sauce

Just a little of this sauce will make a big difference to a recipe. Fish sauce is used in Asian cooking, be adventurous and add to other types of dishes to enhance the flavour. Read your label when purchasing as you just want fish and salt, no preservatives or sugar added.

maple syrup, 100%

Maple syrup is an earthy, sweet tasting amber liquid that is produced by boiling down the sap of maple trees. Use organic 100% maple syrup which is a natural food sweetener, not a flavoured maple syrup. Pure maple syrup contains a decent amount of some minerals, especially manganese and zinc, some traces of potassium and calcium but it does contain a whole bunch of sugar. I try to reduced the amount of sweetness in each recipe to the lowest possible without compromising taste. Feel free to adjust to your liking. I use maple syrup in place of raw honey when I don't want the strong honey flavour coming through in a recipe. I have paleo cookies and desserts in my cookbook made from whole food ingredients with natural sugars but please don’t overindulge. Use as a treat only for special occasions.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

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