Lemon Bliss Balls

Lemon Bliss Balls

  • Serves: 20
  • Prep Time: 00:20
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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Lemon zest makes these protein dense balls a refreshing, not too sweet snack. Perfect to keep blood sugar levels balanced and prevent those sweet cravings we sometimes get.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1 cup almonds
  • 1/2 cup coconut (organic desiccated)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 3 Tbsp fine lemon zest, (approx. 2 lge or 3 sml lemons)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp honey (unprocessed), or to taste
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (organic)
  • Extra coconut (organic desiccated), to coat balls

Directions

Add the almonds, coconut, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and salt to a food processor. Process for 12 - 15 seconds to break up the nuts and seeds.

Add the coconut oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, honey and vanilla. Process for approximately 20 - 25 seconds or until the mixture is moist and comes together, (tiny bits of nuts and seeds should still be visible).

Use your hands to squeeze small amounts of mixture together (roughly the size of a walnut), roll into approximately 20 balls. Roll each ball in coconut (I find, by placing coconut into my palm and rolling the ball while pressing lightly, the coconut sticks well).

Place in the fridge to firm up before serving. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, also suitable to freeze (if freezing, thaw before serving).

Note: For extra lemony, add ¼ - ½ teaspoon of organic lemon extract.

almonds

Almonds have 240mg of calcium in 50gms, as much as is found in 200ml of milk. Nuts are a great protein snack. Eat them raw or activated and it's best to avoid store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils. When ground finely almonds make a wonderful nut meal/flour for grain-free baking.

coconut (organic desiccated)

In the majority of my recipes where I use dried coconut, I use finely-shredded desiccated coconut (unless I have stated otherwise). Make sure you are purchasing unsweetened and organic - many regular brands contain preservatives (sulphur dioxide).

pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

Pumpkin seeds or pepitas are an amazing health food, a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds contains nearly half of the recommended daily amount of magnesium. They are small packages full of nutrition (plant based omega 3 fats, zinc, anti-inflammatory benefits). Sprinkle over salads, add to snack bars, granola, smoothies and they can also be ground down to add to grain free baked goods.

sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds have a mild nutty flavour. An excellent snack as they are high in protein, delicious added to smoothies and grain free baking. Sunflower seeds can be finely ground to replace almond and other nut meals/flours in baked goods, substitute ratio 1:1. They are high in Vitamin E. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals. Sunflower seeds are also a good source of magnesium, which can help calm your nerves, muscles and blood vessels.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

lemon zest

Lemon zest is the finely grated yellow skin of the citrus fruit lemon. The lemon skin is where you will find the oil. To make lemon zest, use a fine zest grater so you can avoid the bitter white pith under the skin.

lemon juice

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice. Most store bought lemon juice containers preservatives.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

vanilla extract (organic)

Use an organic vanilla extract (not an essence) or vanilla powder. Vanilla makes a big difference to the flavour of a recipe, I recommend keeping to the quantities I have stated in a recipe. I prefer Madagascar pure vanilla extract manufactured by ‘Simply Organic’ and for powder, Vanillamax 100% pure, finely ground Madagascar vanilla beans produced by Bulletproof.

coconut (organic desiccated)

In the majority of my recipes where I use dried coconut, I use finely-shredded desiccated coconut (unless I have stated otherwise). Make sure you are purchasing unsweetened and organic - many regular brands contain preservatives (sulphur dioxide).

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