Asian Salad Dressing

Asian Salad Dressing

  • Serves: 200ml
  • Prep Time: 00:05
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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A light fresh, sesame dressing to toss through your salads. It works well with coleslaw and green salad mixes. This dressing also adds a boost of flavour to chicken salads. Pour over the dressing then sprinkle with a teaspoon of sesame seeds.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 2 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Juice from 1 lemon(s)
  • 2 tsp maple syrup (100%), or honey (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp chilli, powder (or to your taste)
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper, ground

Directions

Combine all the dressing ingredients into a glass jar or jug. Whisk vigorously or seal your jar with the lid and shake well to emulsify all the ingredients together.

Store in a sealed jar in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Whisk or shake before pouring over your salad.

Note: You can halve the recipe if you are making a small salad and the sweetener can be omitted if you prefer. I like the dressing tangy so I don't add any sweetness but traditionally Asian dressings have honey or sugar added.

sesame oil

Sesame seed oil adds extra flavour to Asian cooking. Purchase sesame oil that contains no MSG and no preservatives. Store in the fridge once opened. Sesame seed oil can help heart health and is good for the skin both topically and internally. It contains anti-cancer compounds, including phytic acid, magnesium and phytosterols.

olive oil

The olive fruit of the olive tree is pressed and crushed to released the oil. Healthy fats like olive oil are essential for brain function and to transport vitamins and minerals throughout our bodies. This is a delicious oil to drizzled over salads and vegetables.

fish sauce

Just a little of this sauce will make a big difference to a recipe. Fish sauce is used in Asian cooking, be adventurous and add to other types of dishes to enhance the flavour. Read your label when purchasing as you just want fish and salt, no preservatives or sugar added.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.

apple cider vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is used extensively throughout my recipes due to its health benefits. When purchasing, look for raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar ‘with the mother’ it has a cloudy appearance. Avoid malt vinegars as they are made from barley and contain gluten.

lemon(s)

The lemon is a citrus fruit which makes it high in vitamin C. Lemons have a distinctive sour taste which makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods. The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking.

maple syrup (100%)

Maple syrup is an earthy, sweet tasting amber liquid that is produced by boiling down the sap of maple trees. Use organic 100% maple syrup which is a natural food sweetener, not a flavoured maple syrup. Pure maple syrup contains a decent amount of some minerals, especially manganese and zinc, some traces of potassium and calcium but it does contain a whole bunch of sugar. I try to reduced the amount of sweetness in each recipe to the lowest possible without compromising taste. Feel free to adjust to your liking. I use maple syrup in place of raw honey when I don't want the strong honey flavour coming through in a recipe. I have paleo cookies and desserts in my cookbook made from whole food ingredients with natural sugars but please don’t overindulge. Use as a treat only for special occasions.

chilli

Chilli is the spicy fruit of plants that belong to the capsicum family. It is eaten fresh or dried. Chilli powder is dried and ground red chilli peppers. They are members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. Red chillies contain large amounts of vitamin C and are a good source of most B vitamins, they are also very high in potassium, magnesium and iron.

black pepper, ground

Black and white pepper both come from the fruit of a tropical vine. Black pepper is the cooked and dried unripe fruit, know as a peppercorn and white pepper is from the ripe fruit seed. Pepper is usually coupled with salt, sprinkled over or added to food.