Mango & Ginger Chutney

Mango & Ginger Chutney

  • Serves: 2 1/2 cups
  • Prep Time: 00:10
  • Cooking Time: 00:35
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This flavour-packed sweet and spicy chutney is delicious served with roasted meats. It's also perfect to spread on grain-free crackers or to serve on platters with olives, pickled vegetables, cold cuts and pate. This is a no-fuss summer chutney recipe. You can also use frozen mango in place of fresh if not in season. A jar of chutney is also a great homemade gift to give to someone special, just add a ribbon to the jar.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 2 Lge mango(s), stoned, peeled & diced
  • 1 Lge onion(s), diced
  • 2 tsp coconut oil, for cooking
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 Tbsp finely grated ginger, or minced
  • 2 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2/3 cup filtered water
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • Juice from 1 lemon(s)

Directions

Add the onion and coconut oil to a large saucepan and saute on medium for 3 - 4 minutes or until soft and transparent.

Add the mango, coconut sugar, ginger, salt, mixed spice, curry powder and cumin to the pot, stir to combine.

Pour in the water, vinegar and lemon juice, increase heat to bring to the boil. Then reduce to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally for approximately 30 minutes or until the mixture has thickened.

Set aside to cool, then spoon into sterilized jars with airtight lids. Store in the fridge for up to 8 weeks.

Serve with roast meats or on share platters with cold cuts, olives and pickled vegetables.

mango(s)

If possible purchase locally grown mango. Mangoes have been named the most widely consumed fruit in the world. They contain over 20 vitamins and minerals. Some of the possible health benefits include a decreased risk of macular degeneration, decreased risk of colon cancer, improvement in digestion and bone health, plus skin and hair.

onion(s)

In my recipes when listing onion I am referring to a brown (also called yellow) onion. Onions are members of the allium plant family which also includes garlic, leeks, spring onions and shallots. Onions are valued more for the flavour they impart in cooking than for their nutritional content. Onions are know for their antibacterial effect helping to prevent superficial infections and their sulfur compounds may block carcinogens.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

coconut sugar

Coconut palm sugar is produced from the sap of the flower bud of the coconut palm tree and is a natural food sweetener. I use it when a dry sweetener is required. It has the benefit of a low glycemic index (low GI 35 compared to sugar at 68) and nutritional content. Use in baked goods as an occasional treat but don't overindulge. For a finer texture, add your coconut sugar to the small bowl of a food processor or blender and blend for 8 seconds or until it reaches a fine powder. The colour will lighter once ground.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

sea salt

Organic unbleached, unrefined organic Celtic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt is my salt of choice as these contain healthy minerals and trace elements that our body needs. Regular table salt has been bleached, refined and processed leaving minimal health benefits. If you choose to use regular table salt in my recipes you will need to reduce the quantity or the end result will be to salty.

mixed spice

Mixed spice is a blend of sweet spices. Cinnamon is the dominant flavour, with nutmeg and allspice, some brands may also contain cardamom. It is called pumpkin spice in the USA. It is often used in the baking of sweet foods and fruits.

curry powder

Curry powder is a mix of spices, different brands can have different combinations. Most curry powder recipes contain coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek, chili peppers, garlic, caraway and can also contain mustard seed and cinnamon. Read your labels as some cheaper brands container fillers like maize (corn), I purchase the 'Simply Organic' brand.

cumin

Cumin is a medium - hot spice which blends well in curries and is the main spice in the Middle Eastern dip, hummus. It is being studied for potential anti-oxidant and anticancer effects.

filtered water

I feel it's much better for our health if we filter our water. Our tap water contains disinfectants, chlorine and chloramine. Also floride is add which I believe is toxin to our bodies.

apple cider vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is used extensively throughout my recipes due to its health benefits. When purchasing, look for raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar ‘with the mother’ it has a cloudy appearance. Avoid malt vinegars as they are made from barley and contain gluten.

lemon(s)

The lemon is a citrus fruit which makes it high in vitamin C. Lemons have a distinctive sour taste which makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods. The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking.