Tuna & Zucchini Slice

Tuna & Zucchini Slice

  • Serves: 6
  • Prep Time: 00:15
  • Cooking Time: 00:40
Print

This tasty, easy Tuna and Zucchini Slice is packed with protein and vegetables. It makes the perfect healthy lunch or dinner and freezes well to pop into lunchboxes. It's a dairy-free, gluten/grain-free version with a twist to the favourite zucchini slice love by so many. I've covered all your macronutrients in this slice. I like to serve this slice at room temperature but it's also delicious warm served with vegetables on the side.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 6 Lge egg(s)
  • 1/4 cup coconut cream
  • 4 Tbsp nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1 sml onion(s), finely diced
  • 1/2 cup grated carrot(s)
  • 125g frozen spinach leaves, thawed & water squeezed out
  • 425g can tuna (wild caught), in spring water (drained)
  • 3 Tbsp coconut flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder (gluten free)
  • Sea salt and black pepper, ground
  • 1 med zucchini, thinly sliced

Directions

Preheat oven to 170c (fan-forced). Line a 27 x 17cm slice pan with baking paper, allow a little to overhang for easy removal.

Add the eggs and coconut cream to a large bowl and whisk with a fork. Add the nutritional yeast flakes, onion, carrot, spinach, tuna, coconut flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. Mix well to combine. Add the thinly sliced zucchini to the tuna mixture and stir to distribute the zucchini evenly throughout.

Spoon into the prepared pan, spread out evenly and smooth the surface.

Bake for 40 minutes or until golden and the slice is firm to the touch. Set aside in the pan to cool.

Transfer to a large chopping board. Cut into serving-size pieces. Serve with salad on the side.

Suitable to freeze. Cut into individual pieces wrapped before freezing (freeze for up to 3 months).

egg(s)

I have used large free range or organic eggs from a 700g carton in my recipes. Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids, also studies have shown that lutein (yellow colour) in egg yolks protects against the progress of early heart disease.

coconut cream

I use this extensively throughout my recipes; from soups to dinners to desserts and cakes. I think it is the best dairy-free alternative. It gives so much flavour and creaminess to a wide variety of dishes. When purchasing in the can read your labels, even some organic brands contain gums and thickeners, choose full-fat not low-fat versions. I use Honest To Goodness organic cream 400ml and Ayam which isn't organic but has no additives or thickeners and is much creamier and thicker than other brands (that's why I love it), it comes in 400ml, 270ml and 140ml size cans.

nutritional yeast flakes

Also know as Savoury Yeast Flakes. It’s a fermented and deactivated yeast, which means it isn’t going to grow (and has nothing to do with brewer’s yeast or bakers’ yeast). It has a creamy cheesy flavour and I’ve used it in a few recipes to create a cheese flavour. Vegans use it as a condiment and a cheese substitute, and to also add additional protein and vitamins to their diet (it’s a complete protein). Nutritional yeast flakes are free from sugar, dairy, grains and gluten. Do not confuse it with yeast extract (MSG). Purchase from health food stores or in the health food aisle of supermarkets.

onion(s)

In my recipes when listing onion I am referring to a brown (also called yellow) onion. Onions are members of the allium plant family which also includes garlic, leeks, spring onions and shallots. Onions are valued more for the flavour they impart in cooking than for their nutritional content. Onions are know for their antibacterial effect helping to prevent superficial infections and their sulfur compounds may block carcinogens.

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

spinach leaves

I use English baby spinach leaves in my recipes. This more modern variety of spinach is more tender than older varieties and has small flat leaves. They can be eaten raw or lightly cooked. Spinach is a powerhouse food, it contains vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients. Spinach is low in carbs but high in insoluble fibre and may improve eye health, and help prevent heart disease and cancer.

tuna (wild caught)

Tuna is a saltwater finfish, choose wild caught tuna not farmed. When purchasing canned tuna, select pole and line caught, in brine or spring water (this will prevent the tuna being stored in unhealthy oils), also choose in a BPA free can. Read your labels and look at the origin. Tuna is a good source of omega 3 fatty acids, protein and vitamin D.

coconut flour

Coconut flour is made by drying and grinding the meat of a coconut to a fine texture. Coconut flour is a low-carb flour that's an excellent source of dietary fibre and protein. It's a good grain-free and nut-free alternative but does require a larger amount of liquid than normal when used for baked goods. When replacing in a recipe that calls for wheat flour (or almond meal), use this guide; 1 cup of regular flour = 1/3 cup coconut flour, add an extra egg and an extra 1/3 cup of liquid. It can be used in soups, gravies and stews as a thickener and adds a boost of nutrition. Coconut flour may promote stable blood sugar levels and a healthy heart. In addition, it may have antibacterial properties and aid digestion and weight loss. There are now quite a few brands of coconut flour available and they all seem to perform differently depending on how coarse the texture is. In my recipes, I used Organic Coconut Flour from 'Let's Do Organic' and 'Red Tractor Foods' I like their finer texture.

baking powder (gluten free)

Baking Powder is a rising agent for baked goods. If substituting for baking soda you will need 4 times the quantity. Ensure you purchase a gluten free, no aluminum brand. Alternatively, you can make your own baking powder; 1 teaspoon of baking powder is equal to 1⁄4 teaspoon of baking soda and 1⁄2 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Note, that they should only be combined when preparing your recipe.

black pepper, ground

Black and white pepper both come from the fruit of a tropical vine. Black pepper is the cooked and dried unripe fruit, know as a peppercorn and white pepper is from the ripe fruit seed. Pepper is usually coupled with salt, sprinkled over or added to food.

zucchini

A zucchini is also called a courgette or summer squash depending on which country you live in. Zucchini looks similar to a cucumber and is usually served cooked with it's skin left on. Zucchini contains a good amount of folate, potassium, vitamin A,C and fibre.