Zucchini Slice

Zucchini Slice

  • Serves: 4 - 6
  • Prep Time: 00:15
  • Cooking Time: 00:45
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This is my version of the humble Zucchini Slice. It's packed with zucchini, bacon and lots of flavour. My family didn't even notice it was dairy-free or wheat-free. This slice is kid-friendly and can be served hot or chilled with salad. It's also the perfect healthy breakfast on the run and being nut-free it's suitable for school lunchboxes.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1 med (375g) zucchini, grated unpeeled
  • 1 med onion(s), finely diced
  • 200g rindless bacon, diced into small pieces (nitrate-free)
  • 3 Tbsp nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1/3 cup arrowroot flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking powder (gluten free)
  • Sea salt and ground pepper , to taste
  • 5 lge egg(s)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, light flavour
  • 1 Tbsp coconut aminos

Directions

Grease a 28 x 18cm oven-proof dish with olive oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 170c (fan-forced).

Add the zucchini, onion, bacon and nutritional yeast flakes to a large bowl. Use a fork to mix the ingredients together.

Sift the coconut flour, arrowroot and baking powder into a separate bowl, then add the salt and pepper and stir to combine all the dry ingredients together. Add the flours to the zucchini mixture and mix well coating the mixture well with the flour.

Add the eggs, oil and coconut aminos to a medium bowl and lightly whisk to combine.

Pour the egg mixture over the zucchini and flour ingredients and mix well to combine them all together.

Spoon into the prepared dish and smooth the top.

Bake for 45 minutes or until golden and firm to the touch. Let sit for 10 minutes before slicing into serving-size portions.

Serve warm or chilled with salad. Store covered in the fridge for up to 5 days. Suitable to freeze, cut into serving-size pieces first.

zucchini

A zucchini is also called a courgette or summer squash depending on which country you live in. Zucchini looks similar to a cucumber and is usually served cooked with it's skin left on. Zucchini contains a good amount of folate, potassium, vitamin A,C and fibre.

onion(s)

In my recipes when listing onion I am referring to a brown (also called yellow) onion. Onions are members of the allium plant family which also includes garlic, leeks, spring onions and shallots. Onions are valued more for the flavour they impart in cooking than for their nutritional content. Onions are know for their antibacterial effect helping to prevent superficial infections and their sulfur compounds may block carcinogens.

bacon

Choose grass-fed bacon that is nitrate free to avoid added chemicals and additives.

nutritional yeast flakes

Also know as Savoury Yeast Flakes. It’s a fermented and deactivated yeast, which means it isn’t going to grow (and has nothing to do with brewer’s yeast or bakers’ yeast). It has a creamy cheesy flavour and I’ve used it in a few recipes to create a cheese flavour. Vegans use it as a condiment and a cheese substitute, and to also add additional protein and vitamins to their diet (it’s a complete protein). Nutritional yeast flakes are free from sugar, dairy, grains and gluten. Do not confuse it with yeast extract (MSG). Purchase from health food stores or in the health food aisle of supermarkets.

coconut flour

Coconut flour is made by drying and grinding the meat of a coconut to a fine texture. Coconut flour is a low-carb flour that's an excellent source of dietary fibre and protein. It's a good grain-free and nut-free alternative but does require a larger amount of liquid than normal when used for baked goods. When replacing in a recipe that calls for wheat flour (or almond meal), use this guide; 1 cup of regular flour = 1/3 cup coconut flour, add an extra egg and an extra 1/3 cup of liquid. It can be used in soups, gravies and stews as a thickener and adds a boost of nutrition. There are now quite a few brands of coconut flour available and they all seem to perform differently depending on how coarse the texture is. In my recipes I used Organic Coconut Flour from 'Let's Do Organic' and 'Red Tractor Foods' I like their finer texture.

arrowroot flour

Arrowroot is a herb, the roots are cultivated for its starch properties. It is used in my recipes as a thickener and I also like combining it with almond meal to produce a much lighter texture, more like a gluten flour. I find the starch helps to bind the ingredients together. You can substitute tapioca flour, which is made from the dried roots of the cassava plant. Tapioca can be used in baking, it has a slightly sweet flavour. However, I do not recommend thickening with tapioca, as it has a stretchy, gummy texture. Supermarkets only sell in very small containers, which is not cost effective. Purchase from baking specialty stores, health food stores or online. ( When substituting for cornflour in recipes, 2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 tablespoon cornflour/starch).

baking powder (gluten free)

Baking Powder is a rising agent for baked goods. If substituting for baking soda you will need 4 times the quantity. Ensure you purchase a gluten free, no aluminum brand. Alternatively, you can make your own baking powder; 1 teaspoon of baking powder is equal to 1⁄4 teaspoon of baking soda and 1⁄2 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Note, that they should only be combined when preparing your recipe.

egg(s)

I have used large free range or organic eggs from a 700g carton in my recipes. Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be a complete protein because they contain all 9 essential amino acids, also studies have shown that lutein (yellow colour) in egg yolks protects against the progress of early heart disease.

olive oil

The olive fruit of the olive tree is pressed and crushed to released the oil. Healthy fats like olive oil are essential for brain function and to transport vitamins and minerals throughout our bodies. This is a delicious oil to drizzled over salads and vegetables.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.