Cauliflower and Parsnip Mash

Cauliflower and Parsnip Mash

  • Serves: 6
  • Prep Time: 00:10
  • Cooking Time: 00:15
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Serve my Cauliflower and Parsnip Mash as an alternative to mashed white potato. This creamy and fluffy, low carb mash is delicious served with a roast, stews, meatballs or use to top Shepherd's Pie or any dish where mash is needed. By adding parsnips to cauliflower mash you get more flavour and a better texture, as cauliflower on its own is more like a puree.

Ingredients

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  • 3 (approx 380g) parsnip(s), peeled and chopped small
  • 1 med head cauliflower, chopped into small florets
  • 3 - 4 Tbsp coconut cream
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • Sea salt and black pepper, ground, to taste
  • Serve with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkling of parsley

Directions

Add the parsnip to a large saucepan of simmering water and cook for approximately 5 minutes then add the cauliflower. Cook the vegetables for a further 10 minutes or until tender (cooking time will depend on the size of your vegetables). Drain the vegetables well then add them to a blender or food processor.

Add the coconut cream, olive oil, salt and pepper to the vegetables and blend to a smooth fluffy mash. Taste and adjust your seasoning.

Serve with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkling of fresh parsley.

The mash is also suitable to freeze (I freeze in single serves to make it easy to defrost).

parsnip(s)

Parsnip is a root vegetable closely related to the carrot and grown as an annual. It has a sweet flavour, delicious in stews and soups, roasts well and I enjoy them cut into fries or chips and cooked in coconut oil. Parsnips are high in vitamins and minerals, especially potassium and also contain both soluble and insoluble dietary fibre. Choose firm parsnips with light coloured skin in season.

cauliflower

Cauliflower is one of the cruciferous vegetables that should be eaten on a regular basis, as it has huge health benefits. One cup of cooked cauliflower provides you with 73% of your DRI of vitamin C, it's also a good source of vitamin K. You will find several dozen studies linking cauliflower to cancer prevention.

coconut cream

I use this extensively throughout my recipes; from soups to dinners to desserts and cakes. I think it is the best dairy-free alternative. It gives so much flavour and creaminess to a wide variety of dishes. When purchasing in the can read your labels, even some organic brands contain gums and thickeners, choose full-fat not low-fat versions. I use Honest To Goodness organic cream 400ml and Ayam which isn't organic but has no additives or thickeners and is much creamier and thicker than other brands (that's why I love it), it comes in 400ml, 270ml and 140ml size cans.

olive oil

The olive fruit of the olive tree is pressed and crushed to released the oil. Healthy fats like olive oil are essential for brain function and to transport vitamins and minerals throughout our bodies. This is a delicious oil to drizzled over salads and vegetables.

black pepper, ground

Black and white pepper both come from the fruit of a tropical vine. Black pepper is the cooked and dried unripe fruit, know as a peppercorn and white pepper is from the ripe fruit seed. Pepper is usually coupled with salt, sprinkled over or added to food.

parsley

Parsley would be the most widely used herb worldwide. Curly leaf parsley is often used as a garnish. Fresh parsley contains useful amounts of vitamin C, calcium, iron and potassium. Parsley is also high in bioflavonoids and other anticancer compounds.