Moroccan Carrot Salad

Moroccan Carrot Salad

  • Serves: 4
  • Prep Time: 00:15
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
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This healthy Moroccan Carrot Salad pairs with so many dishes, it's a great side dish for a BBQ but also presents well served for a more formal meal. I love this salad with lamb burgers. It's a quick and easy salad to make that's packed with lots of flavour and different textures. Best of all this salad is packed with beta carotene, fibre, vitamin K1, potassium and antioxidants.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • DRESSING:
  • Zest from 1 lemon(s)
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp maple syrup (100%)
  • 1 tsp ginger, minced or finely grated
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • Sea salt and black pepper, ground, to taste
  • SALAD:
  • 1/2 red onion(s), finely sliced
  • 4 Lge carrot(s), grated
  • 1/3 cup chopped mint leaves
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 3 Tbsp sultanas (organic), or cranberries

Directions

Add all the dressing ingredients to a medium bowl and whisk together.

Add the sliced onion to the bowl of dressing making sure the onion is covered well with the dressing. Set aside in the fridge for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, place the carrot, mint, parsley and sultanas into a salad or serving bowl and toss.

Just before serving, toss the dressing and onion mixture through the salad.

lemon(s)

The lemon is a citrus fruit which makes it high in vitamin C. Lemons have a distinctive sour taste which makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods. The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking.

lemon juice

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice. Most store bought lemon juice containers preservatives.

olive oil

The olive fruit of the olive tree is pressed and crushed to released the oil. Healthy fats like olive oil are essential for brain function and to transport vitamins and minerals throughout our bodies. This is a delicious oil to drizzled over salads and vegetables.

maple syrup (100%)

Maple syrup is an earthy, sweet tasting amber liquid that is produced by boiling down the sap of maple trees. Use organic 100% maple syrup which is a natural food sweetener, not a flavoured maple syrup. Pure maple syrup contains a decent amount of some minerals, especially manganese and zinc, some traces of potassium and calcium but it does contain a whole bunch of sugar. I try to reduced the amount of sweetness in each recipe to the lowest possible without compromising taste. Feel free to adjust to your liking. I use maple syrup in place of raw honey when I don't want the strong honey flavour coming through in a recipe. I have paleo cookies and desserts in my cookbook made from whole food ingredients with natural sugars but please don’t overindulge. Use as a treat only for special occasions.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

cumin

Cumin is a medium - hot spice which blends well in curries and is the main spice in the Middle Eastern dip, hummus. It is being studied for potential anti-oxidant and anticancer effects.

coriander

Coriander is also know as cilantro. The fresh chopped green leaves in large amounts are a good source of vitamin C. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian, Thai, and Mexican dishes. They are usually tossed through just before serving as the heat can diminish the flavour. The dried fruits are known as coriander seeds, the seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed. The word coriander in food preparation may only be referring to the ground seeds not the plant.

black pepper, ground

Black and white pepper both come from the fruit of a tropical vine. Black pepper is the cooked and dried unripe fruit, know as a peppercorn and white pepper is from the ripe fruit seed. Pepper is usually coupled with salt, sprinkled over or added to food.

onion(s)

In my recipes when listing onion I am referring to a brown (also called yellow) onion. Onions are members of the allium plant family which also includes garlic, leeks, spring onions and shallots. Onions are valued more for the flavour they impart in cooking than for their nutritional content. Onions are know for their antibacterial effect helping to prevent superficial infections and their sulfur compounds may block carcinogens.

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

mint leaves

Peppermint is one of the easiest and hardest herbs to grown. Studies have uncovered a variety of health benefits. Mint leave oil is used as a digestive aid, to relieve pain, it has anticancer properties and can help with allergies.

parsley

Parsley would be the most widely used herb worldwide. Curly leaf parsley is often used as a garnish. Fresh parsley contains useful amounts of vitamin C, calcium, iron and potassium. Parsley is also high in bioflavonoids and other anticancer compounds.

sultanas (organic)

The sultana is a pale green oval seedless grape which has been dried. Sultanas are sweet and used in baking and eaten as a snack. Purchase naturally dried, preservative and oil free sultanas, organic is best.