Chocolate Mint Slice

Chocolate Mint Slice

  • Serves: 25
  • Prep Time: 00:25
  • Cooking Time: 00:00
  • * plus chilling and setting time
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This recipe is the perfect After Dinner Mint Slice. These healthy raw chocolate mint slices are packed with flavour and contain heaps of nutrients. I've made a nut and date base plus a lovely creamy mint filling containing hidden vegetables and topped with a dark chocolate topping. So far no one has guessed I've used baby spinach leaves to colour the mint filling.

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • BASE:
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 10 (1 cup) Medjool date(s), pitted
  • 1/4 cup coconut - finely-shredded (organic)
  • A generous pinch of sea salt
  • 1/4 cup cacao raw powder
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil, softened
  • FILLING:
  • 250g jar or 1 cup cashew butter/spread, discard any oil sitting on top
  • 1/3 cup coconut cream, (use a thick brand like Ayam)
  • 1/4 cup coconut - finely-shredded (organic)
  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 3 Tbsp honey (unprocessed)
  • 2 cups (50g) baby spinach leaves
  • 8 drops peppermint essential oil (edible), or more to your taste
  • 80g cacao butter, melted
  • Pinch of sea salt
  • CHOCOLATE TOPPING:
  • 100g block of 80% dark chocolate
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp maple syrup (100%)
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (organic)

Directions

Line the base and sides of a 20cm square cake tin with baking paper and set aside.

To make the base: Add the almonds, dates, coconut and salt to a food processor and blend for 10 - 15 seconds to start breaking up the nuts and dates. Add the cacao powder and coconut oil. Blend until the mixture becomes moist and sticks together when squeezed between your fingers (approx. 30 seconds). You should still have small bits of the nuts visible in the mixture.

Transfer the base mixture into the prepared tin, spread out evenly over the base and press it down firmly. Place in the freezer while you prepare the filling.

To make the filling: Add all the filling ingredients in order to a blender. Blend on medium for 10 seconds, then use the tamper stick to help push the ingredients onto the blades and release any air pockets while blending. Stop once or twice and scrape down the sides of the blender jug. Blend until you have a smooth and creamy consistency (don't over blend or the cacao butter may rise to the top due to over-heating by the friction of the blades). Taste test and add 1 or 2 more drops of peppermint oil if needed.

Remove the tin from the freezer and spread the peppermint filling evenly over the base. Place it back into the freezer to firm up for 1 hour. The green colour will lighten a little as it sets. Once the filling is firm, remove and spread over the topping.

To make the chocolate topping: Break up the chocolate into small pieces and add to a small saucepan with the coconut oil. Stir continually over a very low heat until melted. Remove from the heat and add the maple syrup and vanilla. Stir well. Remove the tin from the freezer and drizzle the chocolate mixture over the set filling and use a spatula to spread evenly without delay before the chocolate sets. Place in the fridge to set firm.

Lift the slice out of the tin by the baking paper and place on a chopping board for 5 minutes before cutting. Use a large sharp knife to cut 5 x 5 rows or to the size you require and serve.

Store in a sealed container in the fridge for up to one week or in the freezer for up to 3 months. Serve chilled but not frozen.

almonds

Almonds have 240mg of calcium in 50gms, as much as is found in 200ml of milk. Nuts are a great protein snack. Eat them raw or activated and it's best to avoid store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils. When ground finely almonds make a wonderful nut meal/flour for grain-free baking.

Medjool date(s)

I use Medjool dates in my recipes, I like the flavour and softness of these dates. A bonus, there are no preservatives used with these dates. They blend easy when adding to recipes and give a slight caramel flavour.

Medjool dates are an excellent source of dietary fiber, rich in potassium, copper, manganese, magnesium and vitamin B6.

coconut - finely-shredded (organic)

In the majority of my recipes where I use dried coconut, I have used finely-shredded desiccated coconut (unless I have stated otherwise). Make sure you are purchasing unsweetened and organic - many regular brands contain preservatives (sulphur dioxide).

sea salt

Organic unbleached, unrefined organic Celtic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt is my salt of choice as these contain healthy minerals and trace elements that our body needs. Regular table salt has been bleached, refined and processed leaving minimal health benefits. If you choose to use regular table salt in my recipes you will need to reduce the quantity or the end result will be to salty.

cacao raw powder

Raw cacao powder and cocoa are made from the same source but are so different. Cacao powder is raw, unsweetened and in it's natural state, it has a stronger flavour and you would use less than cocoa powder. It is so good for you; high in dietary fibre, iron and is a good source of magnesium and antioxidants. Cocoa has been heated and processed, the high heat when processing kills all the minerals and vitamins.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

cashew butter/spread

Cashew butter/spread is made by blending cashew nuts down to make a smooth paste. I also like to add a little pink Himalayan salt and a drizzle of macadamia oil to produce a delicious nut butter. You will find a recipe in my cookbook on page 306. Cashew butter has a neutral taste, which makes it perfect for adding to recipes to give a creamy texture without affecting the recipes flavour. If you are purchasing cashew butter/spread, make sure it contains 100% cashews, with not unhealthy oils, gums or thickeners.

coconut cream

I use this extensively throughout my recipes; from soups to dinners to desserts and cakes. I think it is the best dairy-free alternative. It gives so much flavour and creaminess to a wide variety of dishes. When purchasing in the can read your labels, even some organic brands contain gums and thickeners, choose full-fat not low-fat versions. I use Honest To Goodness organic cream 400ml and Ayam which isn't organic but has no additives or thickeners and is much creamier and thicker than other brands (that's why I love it), it comes in 400ml, 270ml and 140ml size cans.

coconut - finely-shredded (organic)

In the majority of my recipes where I use dried coconut, I have used finely-shredded desiccated coconut (unless I have stated otherwise). Make sure you are purchasing unsweetened and organic - many regular brands contain preservatives (sulphur dioxide).

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

honey (unprocessed)

Use unrefined or raw honey. It is the most common natural sweetener in my recipes. It's best to buy local unprocessed honey as it has wonderful health benefits and can help with allergies. Generally honey sold in supermarkets has been processed. Honey possesses antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

spinach leaves

I use English baby spinach leaves in my recipes. This more modern variety of spinach is more tender than older varieties and has small flat leaves. They can be eaten raw or lightly cooked. Spinach is a powerhouse food, it contains vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients. Spinach is low in carbs but high in insoluble fibre and may improve eye health, and help prevent heart disease and cancer.

peppermint essential oil (edible)

Use a high-quality edible, pure essential oil, I use the Doterra brand. Essential oils are very concentrated so only a few drops are needed.

cacao butter

Raw organic cacao butter is also known as chocolate butter. It is used to make chocolate, truffles and desserts. Raw cacao butter is made by cold pressing ground cacao to prevent the lost of vital nutrients and separates the thick and creamy butter from the fibrous powder. It sets firm and gives a rich chocolate flavour. Choose certified organic, cold-pressed and non-gmo, my favourite brands are Chefs Choice or Lovingearth. Cacao butter is high in antioxidants, healthy fats and is a good mood support.

sea salt

Organic unbleached, unrefined organic Celtic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt is my salt of choice as these contain healthy minerals and trace elements that our body needs. Regular table salt has been bleached, refined and processed leaving minimal health benefits. If you choose to use regular table salt in my recipes you will need to reduce the quantity or the end result will be to salty.

dark chocolate

In some of my recipes I have used Paleo approved dark chocolate drops/chips, they are dairy, soy, and gluten-free (my favourite brands are, 'Absolute Organic' or 'Chef's Choice' certified organic 70% cacao, purchase online or from health food stores). I also used 70 - 85% organic dark chocolate blocks, they can be broken into pieces or melted for recipe. I also make my own chocolate from: cacao butter or coconut oil, raw cacao powder and sweetened with 100% maple syrup, pinch of sea salt and vanilla extract.

coconut oil

Coconut oil is one of the most nutritious fats to cook and bake with. Use organic extra-virgin coconut oil which is unrefined and unbleached from non GMO coconuts. Coconut oil has a high smoking point and it is slow to oxidize due to its high saturated fat content, thus, resistant to going rancid. Some studies suggest coconut oil helps with digestion, including irritable bowel, tummy bugs, candida and parasites due to this oil containing short term medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs), which is a healthy form of saturated fat.

maple syrup (100%)

Maple syrup is an earthy, sweet tasting amber liquid that is produced by boiling down the sap of maple trees. Use organic 100% maple syrup which is a natural food sweetener, not a flavoured maple syrup. Pure maple syrup contains a decent amount of some minerals, especially manganese and zinc, some traces of potassium and calcium but it does contain a whole bunch of sugar. I try to reduced the amount of sweetness in each recipe to the lowest possible without compromising taste. Feel free to adjust to your liking. I use maple syrup in place of raw honey when I don't want the strong honey flavour coming through in a recipe. I have paleo cookies and desserts in my cookbook made from whole food ingredients with natural sugars but please don’t overindulge. Use as a treat only for special occasions.

vanilla extract (organic)

Use an organic vanilla extract (not an essence) or vanilla powder. Vanilla makes a big difference to the flavour of a recipe, I recommend keeping to the quantities I have stated in a recipe. I prefer Madagascar pure vanilla extract manufactured by ‘Simply Organic’ and for powder, Vanillamax 100% pure, finely ground Madagascar vanilla beans produced by Bulletproof.