Cashew Chicken

Cashew Chicken

  • Serves: 4 - 6
  • Prep Time: 00:20
  • Cooking Time: 00:25
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In my version of Cashew Chicken I've used shredded cabbage in place of noodles. The Asian satay flavour is achieved by using cashew butter. This is an economical meal that's nutritious and will suit the whole family. (For a nut free version, omit the roasted cashews and replace the cashew butter with sunflower butter).

Ingredients

* Please click on the green icon next to the ingredients listed below for extra details and helpful information.

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp ghee, or coconut oil
  • 1 cup cashews, toasted and roughly chopped
  • 600 - 700g chicken, thigh fillets - skinless & boneless (chopped small)
  • 1 Lge onion(s), diced
  • 3 tsp garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp ginger, minced or finely grated
  • 3 tsp paprika
  • 2 tsp allspice
  • 3 Tbsp cashew butter, or almond
  • 3 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1/2 Lge green cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 2 tsp sea salt, fine
  • 3 carrot(s), grated
  • 3 Tbsp chopped coriander, plus extra to garnish

Directions

Add 1 teaspoon of the ghee to a high sided large 32cm frying pan on medium heat and toast the cashews until lightly brown. Set aside for later.

Add remaining ghee to the pan and increase the heat to medium - high. Add the chicken and cook for 2 minutes on each side to seal. Add the onion and cook 2 minutes stirring through the chicken. Add the garlic, ginger, paprika and allspice and cook for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add the cashew butter and coconut aminos, stir until the cashew butter melts a little and incorporates (making sure the chicken is coated well).

Lay half the sliced cabbage evenly over the chicken mixture and sprinkle with 1/2 the salt (the salt will bring the moisture out of the cabbage to add liquid to the sauce). Repeat with the remaining cabbage and salt. Mix the cabbage through the chicken mixture. Cook tossing until the cabbage has slightly wilted (2 - 3 minutes).

Add the carrot and mix through. Toss cooking until the vegetables are cooked but are not overly soft and mushy (10 - 12 minutes).

Stir through 3/4 cup of cashews and the coriander.

To serve, use tongs to place on individual plates. Garnish with the remaining cashews and a little extra coriander.

ghee

Ghee is clarified butter, it is pure butter fat that has had the milk solids removed. You can get the flavour of butter in your cooking without the dairy (please don't consume if you have an allergy to ghee). My favourite brand is Organic Valley Purity Farms which I purchase online from iherb. It is also very easy to make yourself.

cashews

Cashews work well in a paleo lifestyle, as they are so versatile. They can be used to make dairy free milk, cashew butter, cashew cream or sour cream, dips and many more. Where possible, it is best to soak nuts before using to assist with digestion. Eat them raw but in moderation as they are quite high in omega 6. Stay away from store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils.

chicken

Choose grass fed, free range chicken and organic if available. Chicken is a meat that gets injected with hormones to plumb it up, shop carefully. A good source of protein.

onion(s)

In my recipes when listing onion I am referring to a brown (also called yellow) onion. Onions are members of the allium plant family which also includes garlic, leeks, spring onions and shallots. Onions are valued more for the flavour they impart in cooking than for their nutritional content. Onions are know for their antibacterial effect helping to prevent superficial infections and their sulfur compounds may block carcinogens.

garlic

Garlic is a close relative to the onion and has been used throughout history for both medicinal and culinary purposes. In most of my recipes I use minced garlic as I find it distributes better throughout the dish. When in a hurry I use organic minced garlic which I purchase in glass jars and store in the fridge. When garlic powder is needed for a particular recipe, I use 'Simply Organic' brand. Why is garlic so good for us? It is an immune booster, antibiotic, good for the heart, cancer fighter and it's also knew as a weight loss aid (appetite suppressant).

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

paprika

Paprika is a spice made from grinding dried mild and sweet red chili peppers. Paprika is used to add colour and flavour to a dish. It has a sweet pungent flavour and distinct bitter aftertaste. Even just a small sprinkle of paprika can deliver antioxidants and nutrients like, Vitamin A, E and B6, also iron. I purchase an organic paprika made by 'Simply Organic' (from iherb.com). Paprika is a nightshade.

allspice

Allspice is a dried fruit and gets it's name from its flavour, which seems to be a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. The fruit is picked when green and ripped in the sun, when dried they are brown and look similar to a peppercorn, it is then ground for use in cooking.

cashew butter

Cashew butter is made by blending cashew nuts down to make a smooth paste, I also like to add a little pink himalayan salt and a drizzle of macadamia oil to produce a delicious nut butter. You will find a recipe in my cookbook on page 306. Cashew butter has a neutral taste, which makes it perfect for adding to recipes to give a creamy texture without affecting the recipes flavour. If you are purchasing cashew butter, make sure it contains 100% cashews only, with not gums or thickeners and comes in a glass jar.

coconut aminos

An excellent soy free alternative to soy sauce and tamari. It comes from the sap of the coconut tree and has a sweeter flavour than soy sauce and is not as salty. Coconut aminos can be purchased from health food stores or online. This is one of my favourite ingredients.

green cabbage

There are many different kinds of cabbage, green is the most common cabbage, it has a mild flavour that can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Cabbage is very high in fibre and very low in kilojoules, it contains twice as much folate as the red variety and a source of vitamin C.

sea salt

Organic unbleached, unrefined organic Celtic sea salt or pink Himalayan salt is my salt of choice as these contain healthy minerals and trace elements that our body needs. Regular table salt has been bleached, refined and processed leaving minimal health benefits. If you choose to use regular table salt in my recipes you will need to reduce the quantity or the end result will be to salty.

carrot(s)

This crunchy orange vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. They are good for the eyes and improve night vision. You get vitamin A and a host of other powerful health benefits from carrots, including cancer prevention, helps prevent infections and heart disease, protects teeth and gums and promotes healthier skin.

coriander

Coriander is also know as cilantro. The fresh chopped green leaves in large amounts are a good source of vitamin C. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian, Thai, and Mexican dishes. They are usually tossed through just before serving as the heat can diminish the flavour. The dried fruits are known as coriander seeds, the seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed. The word coriander in food preparation may only be referring to the ground seeds not the plant.

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