Sweet Spiced Almonds

Sweet Spiced Almonds

  • Serves: 2 cups
  • Prep Time: 00:03
  • Cooking Time: 00:20
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This is a sweetly spiced almond snack. They're not only healthy but also quick and easy to make. I've used the sweet-warm spices of cinnamon, allspice and ginger, your taste buds will be delighted.

Ingredients

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  • 2 cups almonds, raw
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp allspice
  • 1/2 tsp ginger
  • 1/2 tsp pink Himalayan salt, fine
  • 2 - 3 Tbsp maple syrup, 100%, to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 160c/320f (fan-forced). Line a baking tray with baking paper.

Add the almonds, spices and salt to a bowl. Mix well. Add the maple syrup and stir through to coat all the almonds well.

Spread the almonds evenly over the prepared tray and bake for 20 minutes. Turn the tray around while cooking to prevent the nuts burning.

After the nuts are cooked they will still be slighlty sticky, they will dry out as they cool.

Once the nuts have cooled, break up any clumps and store in an airtight container.

almonds

Almonds have 240mg of calcium in 50gms, as much as is found in 200ml of milk. Nuts are a great protein snack. Eat them raw or activated and it's best to avoid store bought roasted nuts that have been cooked in canola, sunflower or similar vegetable oils. When ground finely almonds make a wonderful nut meal/flour for grain-free baking.

cinnamon

I am sure you will notice as you read my recipes that cinnamon appears quite frequently. It lends itself to savoury and sweet dishes. I have used ground cinnamon in my recipes if not stated otherwise. The best cinnamon to use is Ceylon (Verum). It has huge health benefits in regulating blood sugar levels. Cinnamon has antifungal properties and candida (yeast overgrowth) cannot live in a cinnamon environment. Added to food it inhibits bacterial growth, making it a natural food preservative and these are just a few of the benefits.

allspice

Allspice is a dried fruit and gets it's name from its flavour, which seems to be a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. The fruit is picked when green and ripped in the sun, when dried they are brown and look similar to a peppercorn, it is then ground for use in cooking.

ginger

Ginger root is widely used as a spice but also for medicinal purposes. It is a hot spice which you will find in many commercial curry powders. It's often used to prevent motion sickness and nausea. Some studies have shown joint swelling in people suffering with arthritis experience less pain and swelling when taken daily. I like to use fresh minced ginger in my meals and dry ground ginger in baked goods.

pink Himalayan salt

Raw pink Himalayan salt crystals is unlike common table salt which can be a highly refined industrial byproduct, otherwise know as sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is completely pure and may naturally balance the body's alkaline/acidity and regulate water content. In addition Himalayan salt helps in the absorption of nutrients from food and contains many trace minerals for healthy cell structure. I purchase fine pink Himalayan crystal salt so I can use it in my shaker and for cooking.

maple syrup, 100%

Maple syrup is an earthy, sweet tasting amber liquid that is produced by boiling down the sap of maple trees. Use organic 100% maple syrup which is a natural food sweetener, not a flavoured maple syrup. Pure maple syrup contains a decent amount of some minerals, especially manganese and zinc, some traces of potassium and calcium but it does contain a whole bunch of sugar. I try to reduced the amount of sweetness in each recipe to the lowest possible without compromising taste. Feel free to adjust to your liking. I use maple syrup in place of raw honey when I don't want the strong honey flavour coming through in a recipe. I have paleo cookies and desserts in my cookbook made from whole food ingredients with natural sugars but please don’t overindulge. Use as a treat only for special occasions.

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